Over the years, we’ve noticed at least three common myths people believe about barndominiums.

Here they are – along with how you can avoid them.

    Myth #1 - Building a Barndominium will cost less than traditional wood framing

Barndominiums have become the buzz word in recent years. But there's a myth that says they are always less expensive than traditional wood framing. This isn't true. What most are calling a Barndominium these days is simply a steel building with living quarters.

We've found you can get the most value out of a steel building with living quarters when you design an open floor plan. Using an open kitchen and living room with minimal interior framing will allow you to take advantage of the large clear spans of a steel building.

     Myth #2 - Any house plan I find online can be made into a Barndominium

Steel building construction is unique. Unlike wood, there are limitations on where you can put things like windows and doors.The value in using a steel building is working with these limitations rather than trying to modify a steel building around the wood frame design. When you force one to look like the other you end up spending more money.

You will gain the most value on a steel building when you bring a flexible mindset to the table. Our Project Managers know how to utilize the best of both elements and will bring them together in harmony. This will allow you to accomplish the utility purpose plus the dream behind your project at the same time.

Myth #3 - Assuming the steel is the most significant cost of the project

If you're building on raw land, the steel may not be the most significant cost of your project. Other potential large budget items are: utilities, dirt work, concrete, road access, septic system and water. We've seen occasions where these costs have dwarfed the cost of the steel building.

When planning for your building, the first thing you should do is determine how to get water and electricity to the building site. Choosing a suitable building site depends on where the right-of-way and access of water and electricity enter the property. 

Some other questions to answer are:

What is terrain of your land like?

What will it take to create a level area for the concrete pad?

Have you quoted the price of concrete?

How long will the driveway be? Will it be gravel or concrete?

Where will you run the septic lines and what kind of septic system will you need?

Talking with a Project Manager about these decisions can prevent surprise expenses for you on the back end.   

Talking with a Project Manager about these decisions can prevent surprise expenses for you on the back end.